Tag Archives: Student Loans

Setka Out

Something miraculous happened today. It’s not epic, like a baby being born or a horrific train derailment that everyone walks away from.

Nope. It’s a tiny miracle. But it’s all mine.

I paid off my car loan.

I began this year with two financial goals. Pay off my student loan (check), and pay off my car loan (just checked). It’s only April.

This. Is. A. Miracle.

And so, it’s time for me to shutter this shop. Writing Cashgab was an incredible journey for me. It was my catalyst for real change. I recently found an email that I sent to Money Mentors (highly recommended, btw) in 2009. It wasn’t until I started writing this blog in early 2012 that my financial life started to blossom. I learned so much about personal finance, such as how to manage a credit card like a Big Girl and the importance of planned spending savings. I also know that I inspired other people to get their financial houses in order. I know this because they wrote me emails, shared comments on my posts, and told me in whispered tones over coffee.

I can’t say that I will never get in financial dire straights again. But I can say that I know how to get out of it if I do: start talking.

It’s that simple. Tell people. Ask for help. Talk about what you’re doing to change. Make yourself accountable.

So many of our money issues are rooted in shame. If you talk about something, you take the stigma away. Ditch your shame.

Gab.

~HS

PS For my beloved regular readers, you are few but you are mighty. Please read my new blog of dispatches from the ‘burbs: Setka in the Suburbs. Money talk will be at a minimum. XO

photoThis sweet ride’s all mine, baby. Jealous? 

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Share your financial resolutions for 2013

fireworks_14

I believe in resolutions at the start of a new year.

I believe in resolutions, period. But there is something magical about the fresh start that a new year brings. Despite what people say about resolutions, I often keep mine.* I owe this fact to being extremely stubborn and having a (cruelly) strong memory.

I’d like to share my financial goals for 2013 with the hope that they inspire you to set your own.

1) Stay the course: I’ve had a great year financially. I’ve learned to manage my credit card (the balance is zero as I write this!), and I’ve learned to save money ($3,000 in planned spending savings; $5,000 in job-absence savings; and $7,000 in retirement savings. Um…yay!) Now would be a great time to rest, right? It’s the optimal time to relax a little. NO WAY! OK, maybe a little. I can probably stop living with my poor-woman mentality, but overall I need to stay on my current path to get where I want to be, which is…

2) Become (almost) debt-free:  Mortgage not included, my main goal is to rid myself of personal debt in the coming 12 months. I have a car loan ($3,190) and the rest of my student loan ($1,300) left. Part of me wants to hit them hard, but I know that slow and steady wins the race, which means I will have to…

3) Prioritize: I have non-financial goals this year that require money to achieve, including replacing the flooring in my condo and taking at least three Master’s classes. That means other goals – like a trip to Whitehorse, YT with my daughter and my partner – will likely have to wait. That’s OK. After all, 2014 is right around the corner. And we all know a new year means new goals and new possibilities.

Please share your financial resolutions (either in the comments section or by emailing me at hasetka@hotmail.com). It will inspire me to reach my own goals.

Happy New Year!

~HS

*If you have trouble keeping yours, here are some tips from Forbes.

Photo: bigfoto.com

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